Unhealthy food promotions to be restricted as part of Scottish obesity consulation

As the new sugar tax approaches, the Scottish Government’s asking the public what else can be done to tackle obesity.

The consultation is part of a multi-million-pound initiative to encourage people to live a healthier lifestyle.

The promotion of food and drink which is high in salt, fat and sugar is to be restricted under the new strategy. This will include multi buy offers on items such as fizzy juice or the temporary promotion of junk food to encourage sales.

Aileen Campbell, the Scottish Government minister for public health and sport, is leading the campaign.

She said: “In Scotland, there are more people who are overweight or at risk of obesity than those who aren’t. That’s why it’s crucial we tackle this epidemic and ask the public for what they believe should be done.”

In 2016, 65% of adults living in Scotland aged 16 and over were overweight, including 29% who were obese. Alongside this, 88% of people who were diagnosed with diabetes were type 2.

final infographic

The Government will invest £42 million in services over the next 5 years. This covers the expansion and greater accessibility of fitness classes, and more support for those living with type two diabetes.

 The plan also includes a ban on the broadcasting of fast food advertisements before the 9pm watershed, alongside offering advice on healthy eating to parents.

The Government will report their findings to the public when the consultation period closes in January.

Official obesity statistics available from here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s